A Scot in London: an introduction

Posted by: Nikki Peters

By Blair Grant

As the sunlight gleaming off the River Clyde slipped into the distance with my train pulling out of Glasgow Central, I knew there was no turning back.  I was finally moving to London.

 

Funnily enough, any of the nervousness which was certainly there as my taxi drove past my now old flat and the BBC Scotland building disappeared as I took my seat in carriage B, only to be replaced with excitement.

 

I settled into the journey, reading with great interest the New Statesman’s fantastic London edition, as the woman opposite unknowingly lessened my mood by slurping loudly from a bottle of cheap white wine.  I politely refused as she offered me a swig from the no doubt warm bottle, grunting: “I don’t have any glasses”.

 

We’ll skip my arrival, the stress of trying to find an electrical fan (who would have thought it so hard?) and more importantly a flat – note to self for future reference: do not attempt to fit nine flat viewings in during one day – and go straight into my first day here at Stand Agency.

 

Now everyone knows you have to make a good first impression when starting a new job.  Clean shaven, the costume de rigueur comprising a sharp suit, crisp shirt and polished shoes and above all else, getting into the office early.

 

I have friends in London and have visited many times, however, crucially I have never been on a ‘rush hour’ train.  On Monday morning I lay awake at 5.30am and mentally prepared myself.  I envisaged extricating myself from the mass of Metropolitan Line bodies with a mixture of guile and force.  I was ready. I needn’t have bothered.

 

Arriving at Finchley Road tube station it gradually dawned on me that I was going to be early for work. Too early.  I read my copy of City A.M. and found a nice cafe to while away the hours – yes hours – until I was supposed to be in work. It was an experience, to say the least.

 

But I’m here now, I have a flat and I have my electrical fan and I’m absolutely loving working and living in London, something I’m sure those reading will learn more about during the coming months.  My background is a political one with understandable interest in the political landscape of Scotland and while far from being an aficionado, I’m sure you’ll hear all about that, too.  Referendum debate, anyone?  Watch this space.

 

 

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